Aug 31, 2013

18 Year Old Airlifted After ATV Accident Near Versailles

VERSAILLES - On Saturday August 31, 2013 at approximately 11:39 AM Darke County Deputies along with Versailles Fire and Rescue, Versailles Police, and CareFlight responded to 9996 Jamison Road on a report of a roll-over All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) injury accident.

Preliminary investigation revealed Nathan Peters 18, Versailles, was driving a 2013 Polaris Ranger (ATV) in a wheat stubble field along with passenger Ian Lawrence 18, Versailles, and made a sharp turn causing the ATV to roll over onto the driver side. Nathan was airlifted to Miami Valley Hospital aboard CareFlight for his injuries, and Ian was uninjured. Both occupants were not wearing helmets.

Nathan is currently listed in fair condition at Miami Valley Hospital.

Sue Homan to speak at Wayne Health Care

GREENVILLE - Sue Homan to speak to Cancer Support on September 5 at Wayne Health Care at 7 p.m. in Conference Room on the third floor. Sue Homan will be speaking about hormones.

HORMONES, HOW ARE THEY AFFECTING YOUR HEALTH?

“Transitions in life can be difficult, and they might have you feeling out of balance. At Kaup Pharmacy, we understand that each woman is unique. That's why we believe in a customized approach to helping you get back to

balance.” Sue Homan, Registered Pharmacist and Hormone Consultant will be providing solutions through lifestyle changes and discussing the basics of Bio-Identical Hormone Restoration Therapy that can change how someone feels.

Sue has been employed by Kaup Pharmacy since graduating as a Registered Pharmacist from Ohio Northern University in 1990 with a Bachelor of Pharmacy Science Degree. She began specializing in Bio-Identical Hormone Restoration Therapy compounding in 1995. Sue has given many BHRT presentations in different locations in West Central Ohio including a one-day BHRT Conference held at Ohio Northern University in 2003. She attends PCCA conferences yearly, and she is a member of the Ohio Pharmacy Association.

Sue and her husband, Larry, are proud parents of six children ages 4-20. She also enjoys being a Religion instructor for Mary Help of Christians Church for the past eight years. Their leisure activities center around family oriented events, such as volleyball, basketball, baseball, and soccer games. When she finds time, Sue enjoys reading, traveling, and horseback riding. Sue can be located at Kaup Pharmacy, 110 East Butler street, Fort Recovery 45846. Or call 419-375-2323 or 1-800-686-2314. Fax 419-375-4488 or 419-375-2486.

Square dance club to offer lessons

BROOKVILLE - The Brookville Curli-Q’s Square Dance Club, which dances monthly on the second Saturday at Brookville’s Golden Gate Park Christena Leiber senior center at 7:30 p.m., is announcing its lesson class for 2013-2014. The lessons will start Sept. 10 and will be held at the First United Methodist Church at 963 Salem St. in Brookville Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m.

This series of lessons will teach you to dance at the Plus level which is the level at which the other Miami Valley Dance Council Clubs and most of the world clubs dance. The instructor and caller will be Nathaniel Arnett.

The reasons you should be motivated to get into square dancing are:

Exercise - during a regular two and a half hour dance you will briskly walk about three to five miles while listening to good music, exercising your mind and body.

Wonderful friendships – you will meet many new people from our club as well as the others that we visit and who visit us on a regular basis.

Special events - in addition to dancing, the club has a picnic, special dinners, trips to Christmas lights, theaters and more.

Food table - every club has a fantastic finger food table at each dance.

Van - the club has a van for travel to the more distant clubs in our council.

Lessons cost - the first two lessons are free. Total cost for all the lessons is $20.00 per person

If you are interested, just show up at the first lesson or if you have any questions please call Betty Thorpe at 952-2199, Renee at 603-4504, or Don at 667-6877. Webb site: http://brookvilleohiosquareandrounddance.yolasite.com.

Red Cross urges households to prepare for emergencies

GREENVILLE - Disasters can strike quickly and often without warning. September is National Preparedness

Month. The American Red Cross Darke County Chapter encourages all households to get ready for the next emergency or disaster. “Having a game plan in place is essential for all households so everyone knows what they should do when an emergency occurs,” said Lynne Gump, Executive Director, “National Preparedness Month is a perfect time for Darke County residents to create or update their plan.”

On Sept. 9, the Darke County Chapter will sponsor a Preparedness Walk to help Darke Countians develop their Family Disaster Plan, receive preparedness tips and learn more about preparedness in the community. “We plan to have over one-hundred volunteers going door-to-door passing out information and Vials of Life,” stated Dan Franks, Chapter Chair, “If we don’t come to your door, please stop by the chapter office and we’ll have information for you there as well.”

MAKE A PLAN - It is important that everyone in the household helps put the emergency plan together and knows what they should do if something occurs. Household members may not be together when a disaster happens – during the day many people are at work and school. The plan should include ways to contact one another and two predetermined places to meet – one near the home in case of a sudden emergency like a fire, and one outside the neighborhood in case circumstances prevent people from returning home. People should also identify an emergency contact person from outside the area in case local telephone lines are overloaded or out of service.

Any emergency plan should also include decisions about where family members will go if ordered to evacuate and what route they will take to get there. It’s a good idea to include alternate routes in case roads are closed. If pets are part of the household, make sure to include plans for them such as pet-friendly hotels and animal shelters along the evacuation route.

RED CROSS APPS - The Red Cross has free mobile apps that provide information on what to do before, during and after emergencies including developing an emergency plan. “People can use the ‘Make a Plan’ feature in the apps to create their plan and then share it with their loved ones,” Gump said. “The preloaded content in the apps gives people access to vital information to use during emergencies, even if they can’t connect to the internet.” The apps can be downloaded from the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross.

OTHER WAYS TO GET READY - Another step to get one’s household ready is to build an emergency kit in a container that is easy to carry so the family can use it at home or take it with them if asked to evacuate. It should contain a three-day supply of water (one gallon, per person, per day), nonperishable food, a flashlight, battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra batteries, a first aid kit, a 7-day supply of medications, a multi-purpose tool, sanitation and personal hygiene items and copies of important personal documents. The Red Cross also recommends having at least two weeks’ worth of emergency supplies at home. Everyone also needs to stay informed about what types of disasters are most likely to occur where they live or where they plan to visit. It is also important to take a First Aid and CPR/AED course—a vital component of disaster preparedness in case emergency help is delayed. For more information on how to prepare for emergencies, people can visit redcross.org or contact the Darke County Chapter at 548-1002, or stop by at 130 Martz Street, Greenville.

Red Cross offers CPR & First Aid class

GREENVILLE - On Sept.17, from 9-2:30 p.m. the Darke County Red Cross will be holding its monthly CPR and First-Aid Class. The Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED course incorporates the latest science and teaches students to recognize and care for a variety of first aid emergencies such as burns, cuts, scrapes, sudden illnesses, head, neck, back injuries, heat and cold emergencies and how to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies to help victims of any age - adults (about 12 years and older) and pediatric (infants and children up to 12 years of age). Students who successfully complete this course will receive a certificate for Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED valid for two years.

This fast-paced, a hand on class is taught by local volunteers who give of their time, to teach others how to save lives. No one wants to think about someone getting injured or becoming ill, but a responsible step is to be prepared and by preparing yourself and your family for an emergency you also help prepare our community to be a safer place to live work and play.

Join your neighbors and friends in learning how to treat accidents, perform CPR and learn basic prevention skills by taking this class, plus keep your knowledge “fresh” by participating in free quarterly on-line refreshers. “So often I hear, what can I do to help”, stated Lynne Gump, executive director of the Darke County Chapter of the American Red Cross, “what can I do to make my family safer”?

Why not become one of those people who are better prepared to prevent emergencies and better able to handle them when they occur. For more information, go online at www.redcross.org under take a class or simply call 1-800-RED-CROSS and get signed up today. Class size is limited and spots are made available on a first come-first signed up basis.

Children's Programs at Library

GREENVILLE - Children’s Programs for Fall are going to be more fun than ever at the Greenville Public Library. A new event has been added - a Saturday afternoon movie each month! The first one is Cars on Sept. 7 at 1 p.m. The other dates are Oct. 26, Nov. 16, and Dec. 14. Pick up your free tickets at the Circulation Desk.

Storytimes begin the week of Sept. 3, 11 a.m. each day. Ages two and under on Thursdays, ages 2-3 on Wednesdays, and 4 and up on Tuesdays. A special story time for all ages takes place at The Coffee Pot at 7 p.m. the 2nd Monday of each month.

Lego Club meets on Thursdays at 7 p.m. Ages 6-8 on Sept. 5, Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5. Ages 9-11 on Sept. 19, Oct. 17, Nov. 21 and Dec. 19. Pick up a bookmark at the Library with the complete schedule!

Kids get ready to watch a movie in the Meeting Room on the Library's third floor.

Concert Band will present Grand Finale

GREENVILLE – The final concert for the season of the Greenville Municipal Concert Band will be presented Sept. 1, 7:30 p.m. The concert will be held at the Marling Band Shell located in the Greenville City Park. The concert will be conducted by JR Price.

This week, the GMCB will present A Grand Finale. The band is very grateful for the wonderful community support this season for their concerts. The Grand Finale concert will feature the spirited overture, The Hounds of Spring. This overture by Alfred Smith is a very exciting and beautiful overture that highlights the talents of the talented French Horn section comprised of Eric Flora, Jon Payne, Anne Shilt and Julie Swank. Featured also in this concert will be Audrey Hathaway. She is the director of bands for the Mississinawa Valley School District. She is a long time member of the band performing on the bassoon. Audrey will be conducting Freefall Overture by David Shaffer and the great OSU fight song Across the Field. The trumpet section will be featured in the timeless park band classic Trumpets Ole. They feature the French Horns one more time with the very beautiful Irish Tune from the County Derry. These great selections and their usual production of marches and popular music should make for a very entertaining evening of music in the park.

There is plenty of seating available for the concert or you are invited to bring your own seating or blankets to sit on and enjoy the show. As always, the concerts are free and open to the public.

Aug 30, 2013

Motorcyclist CareFlighted After Accident

GREENVILLE - On August 30, 2013 at approximately 3:12 p.m. Darke County 911 received a call in reference to an injury accident on SR121 at US36 W, which involved a pickup truck and a motorcycle. Darke County Deputies, along with New Madison Fire and Tri-Village Rescue were dispatched to the scene.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2000 Chevy Silverado operated by Lucas Etchison (25) of Frankton, IN, was eastbound on US36W. Etchison stopped at the intersection then pulled out into the intersection in front of a 2001 Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by Michael Beard (64) of Greenville, which was southbound on SR121. Beard's motorcycle hit the front of Etchison's vehicle, which caused Beard to be ejected from the motorcycle. Beard was treated by Tri-Village Rescue and was transported by CareFlight to Miami Valley Hospital. Beard's condition is unknown at this time. Etchison refused treatment from Tri-Village.

Etchison was cited for Failure to Yield at a Stop Sign.

Greenville Police Beat - Police respond to disorderly conduct,

OVI and assault incidents

On Aug. 22 police were dispatched to Sweitzer and Pine regarding a suspect being intoxicated and disorderly. Joseph Cheadle was found staggering on Sweitzer. The defendant was highly intoxicated with a heavy odor of alcoholic beverage on his breath, slurred speech and trouble finding his balance. He was belligerent and responded to officers with profanity, continuing to annoy and alarm citizens walking on Sweitzer Street. Two victims reported being annoyed by the defendant. Cheadle was arrested on fourth degree misdemeanor and transported to the Darke County Jail.

On Aug. 21 police were dispatched to the area of Ash and E. Main Streets regarding a suspicious intoxicated male urinating on a vehicle tire. The defendant would only identify himself as Kerry and that he just wanted to walk to his motel room. He had a strong odor of alcohol, slurred speech, bloodshot eyes and poor manual dexterity. He had to lean on the police cruiser to keep from falling down. The defendant was later identified and found to have two outstanding warrants but they were from Lake and Warren counties and outside of the pickup radius. The defendant was transported to Darke County Jail and cited for disorderly conduct while being voluntarily intoxicated.

ASSAULT

On Aug. 15 police were dispatched to 625 E. Third St. regarding a fight in progress. Two large groups of individuals who had been arguing with each other. There were conflicting stories on what or who started the argument but it ended up with Ben Townsend and Jack Daniels being out in the roadway together. Townsend was knocked to the ground and hit in the head with a large rock, causing lacerations to the head and facial area. Townsend was transported to Wayne Hospital for treatment. Daniels left the scene but was later found. So far he has not issued a statement on the incident. Due to witness statements police determined there was probable cause to charge Daniels with assault. He was issued a misdemeanor citation.

OPERATING A VEHICLE UNDER THE INFLUENCE (OVI)

On Aug. 21 police were dispatched to the 100 block of Warren St. regarding an accident in which a vehicle was reportedly attempting to leave the scene. The vehicle was partially on the curb and roadway of the southeast corner of Warren and Tiffin Streets. Walking around the vehicle was Homer Pitman. The defendant stated he accidently ran into the stop sign and got hung up on it. Pitman had an odor of alcohol on him and admitted to consuming alcohol. Pitman could not pass the standardized field sobriety test after which he was arrested for OVI, placed in handcuffs and transported to the Greenville Police Department. Pitman also submitted to and failed to pass a breath test. The defendant, who was cooperative throughout the investigation, was issued a citation for OVI and released to his wife.

THEFT/BURGLARY

On Aug. 27 police responded to 418 E. Fourth St. where the resident, Gary Cruze, said sometime around Oct. 31, 2012 someone had broken into his garage and stolen several items. He didn’t make a report because he didn’t think anything could be done about it. The Darke County Sheriff’s Office advised him about two months ago that a listed firearm had been recovered. The Sheriff’s deputy advised Cruze to contact Greenville Police and file a report.

On Aug. 26 police responded to Clark Oil at 1205 Sweitzer St. Complainant advised a black truck filled with $60.01 of gasoline then left without paying. A surveillance video was supplied and police determined the vehicle was a black Dodge with a tool box. No more information at this time.

On Aug. 26 police responded to 923 Harrison Ave. regarding a stolen vehicle complaint. Seth Rhoades said his 1993 Chevy Silverado extended cab pickup was stolen from behind the residence where it had been parked during the fair. The victim stated it was locked and the keys were not in it. The truck is red and black, has a dent in the passenger side door and rear fender corners behind the rear wheels were rolled up. Rhoades believed a suspect in the Arcanum area may have taken it. Police are following up.

EARLY BIRD POLICY

The Greenville Police Beat is prepared from public records available at the Greenville Police Department. Every effort is made to balance the public’s right to know with the rights of the individuals involved. Readers are encouraged to contact Greenville Police if they have information or concerns regarding these or any other incidents they see. The Early Bird notes all suspects are innocent until proven guilty and welcomes comments and concerns regarding this community service.

Sex offender suspect returned to Darke County to face trial

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Codey Michael B. Greer, was returned to Darke County from Randolph County, Ind., Aug. 28 to face three charges of Felony 1 Rape, sexual conduct with a 12-year-old minor.

According to Darke County Chief Deputy Mark Whittaker, Greer and the victim were found in Indiana following the Sheriff Office’s investigation for the missing juvenile. Greer was arrested for transporting a juvenile across a state line and the girl was returned to her family.

A Grand Jury indictment for the three felony charges was returned on Greer Sept. 12, 2012 while he was incarcerated in Indiana. It was based upon the Sheriff Office investigation and interviews by the Darke County Prosecutor’s Office. According to the indictment he engaged in sexual contact with the minor three different times on Sept. 19 and 20.

The defendant had been held in Indiana until he was released from Randolph County, Ind. to Darke County deputies on Aug. 28 of this year.

Darke County Prosecutor R. Kelly Ormsby said Greer will be arraigned in the next few days. An attorney will be assigned if he doesn’t already have one and the subject of bond discussed.

“There’s not too much else I can tell you at this time,” Ormsby added.

Each Felony 1 count carries a prison term of 10 years to life.

Sterling House/Clare Bridge of Greenville celebrates Associate Appreciation week

GREENVILLE - Sterling House/Clare Bridge of Greenville, a Brookdale Community celebrated Associate Appreciation Week Aug. 26 – Aug. 30.

Throughout the week, associates received a series of gifts of appreciation as well as participate in casual dress days. The week concluded with an associate cook out.

“Our associates do a great job in working with our residents and visitors and they make a difference in the lives of the people we serve every day by providing them with a purposeful and meaningful lifestyle where compassion, respect, excellence, and integrity are embraced. It is important that we take time to recognize the phenomenal effort our associates put forth and acknowledge the value they bring to our organization,” said Bryan Davenport, Executive Director.

Volunteer Network

GREENVILLE – The Darke County Volunteer Network will meet on Sept. 10, noon, at the State of the Heart Hospice building, 1350 North Broadway, Greenville. All area volunteer administrators are invited to attend. This group is free and anyone that manages volunteers are welcome.

This is a brown bag lunch meeting and they work to keep the meetings strictly to an hour. Any questions, call Greg Morrow, RSVP director at 548-8002 or email at gmorrow@councilonruralservices.org.

Grief Group meetings will begin Sept. 9

GREENVILLE – State of the Heart Hospice is offering adult grief support meetings beginning Sept. 9 and continuing each Monday night through Oct. 14. The sessions are free and are open to anyone in the community. It is not necessary to be associated with hospice care. The meetings will be held from 6-8 p.m. at the State of the Heart office, 1350 N. Broadway, Greenville.

Co-facilitators of the group will be Bereavement Specialists Marlene Black and Meredith Carpe.

The benefit of the meetings, Black said, “is that those attending find there are others experiencing grief just as they are. They find they are not alone in their grief, and they begin talking and sharing their feelings about loss. In many instances, friendships are formed.”

Bereavement support is an important part of the care provided by hospice and is offered to adults and children. There is no charge for any of the bereavement services provided by State of the Heart. To register for the upcoming grief support meetings, call Black or Carpe at 548-2999. Visit the agency web site at www.StateoftheHeartCare.org.

Seminarian Fund supports future priests

VERSAILLES – Melvin and Mary Ann Stucke of Versailles have started a fund at the HOPE Foundation to assist young men from Darke County who are studying to be a Catholic priest. Their desire is to encourage other donors from Darke County to join their effort and to inspire similar funds in neighboring counties to assist young men in those counties.

“We want to show seminarians that we support them and are so proud of their decision to serve the Church community,” said Melvin. “Becoming a priest requires so many years of study and discipline that we hope this scholarship will give them a little boost,” he added.

As an incentive for donors to contribute to this fund, the Stuckes will match any donation up to $250. Named “The North Deaneries Seminarian Fund,” the fund awards scholarships to seminarians from the St. Marys Deanery and Sidney Deanery of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.

The first scholarship recipient is Eric Wood, son of Kathy Wood and the late Jack Wood of Versailles. Eric is in his fourth year of major seminary at Mt. St. Marys Seminary of the West in Cincinnati. He will be ordained a priest in May 2015. Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Franciscan University of Steubenville in 2010.

As an endowment fund, the North Deaneries Seminarian Fund will operate primarily from investment income, providing scholarships for seminarians every year in perpetuity. To inquire about the matching fund opportunity, contact Christy Prakel at the HOPE Foundation, 548-4673. For more information about the HOPE Foundation, visit www.hopedarkecounty.com. As the community foundation of Darke County, the HOPE Foundation receives, administers and distributes charitable gifts for the benefit of Darke County residents.

Melvin and Mary Ann Stucke of Versailles started a fund at the HOPE Foundation of Darke County to support future Catholic priests. The first scholarship from the North Deaneries Seminarian Fund was awarded to Eric Wood, 4th year seminary student at Mt. St. Marys Seminary of the West. Pictured from left: Christy Prakel, president of the HOPE Foundation, Mary Ann Stucke, Eric Wood, and Melvin Stucke.

Greenville BPW kicks off 2013-2014 year

Mike Stegall
GREENVILLE – The Greenville Business & Professional Women’s (BPW) Club is preparing for its first meeting of the new business year. The Club will be meeting on Sept. 12 in the Private Dining Room at the Brethren Retirement Community, 750 Chestnut St., Greenville. The dinner meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Darke County Commissioner Mike Stegall is the guest speaker for the evening. In honor of National Constitution Week, which begins on Sept. 16, Mike will be educating the Club on the Constitution of the United States. The Constitution is the supreme law of the United States and was adopted on Sept. 17, 1787. Stegall is owner of Stegall Contractors and has worked for the family business since 1974. He served as a Greenville Township Trustee from 2006-2010 and was elected as Darke County Commissioner in 2010. Mike has been involved in Darke County’s economic development, increase in employment, and the growth of businesses including the Continental-Carbon expansion, Poly One expansion, FRAM expansion and Midmark expansion. He has participated in the Coffee with the Commissioner discussions.

Lora Manon is also speaking at the meeting. She presently holds the position of Ohio/BPW Parliamentarian and is a past Ohio/BPW President.

The Greenville BPW Club would like to invite women interested in learning more about the club to the meeting. Call Marilyn Emmons at 548-5824 before noon on Sept. 9, to make a reservation to attend this meeting. The cost is $10 per person.

Thank you for support

GREENVILLE – The Flower Patch would like to thank all of their sponsors that helped make this year’s Little Miss and Little Mister Pageant at The Great Darke County Fair a success. Without their help, it would not have been possible to give the prizes they were able to give and put together a full colored program. A thank you is extended to the following business: Darke County YMCA, Wieland Jewelers, Barbara Rethlake Dance Studio, Wayne Healthcare, Creative Carpet Supply, KT Klosterman Photography, Dave Knapp, Angela Drees – DJ Rose Realty, Eikenberry’s IGA, Fitzwater Tree & Lawn Care, Francis Furniture, Fry & Co, G&G Floor Fashions, Greenville National Bank, Greenville Ace Hardware, Greenville Federal, Schmerge Chiropractic, Hittle’s, Mercer Savings Bank, Oliver Floyd Funeral Home, Staffmark, Second National Bank, Flory Landscaping & Lawn Care, Bach to Rock, Dick Lavy Trucking, Hansbarger’s Home Solutions, Williamson Insurance and Jafe Decorating.

POP meeting is Sept. 11

VERSAILLES – Versailles Health Care Center invites the community to its monthly event for people with Parkinson’s Disease and their families! Power Over Parkinson’s meets monthly to exercise, socialize, and learn. The guest speaker for the evening will be Dr. Anthony Monnin, UCA. Dr. Monnin will be sharing his presentation, “Benefits of Upper Cervical Care for People with Parkinson’s” with the group.

The Power Over Parkinson’s session will be led by Shannon Condon, Speech Therapist, and Gina Boerger, Physical Therapist. They will lead the group in vocal and physical exercise. Shannon and Gina hope to offer positive resources to people with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. The Power Over Parkinson’s group will take place Sept. 11, 4 p.m. It will be held at the Rehab Clinic at Versailles Health Care Center. This is a free meeting. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. There will also be a door prize giveaway, good for a free entrée, compliments of Michael Anthony’s at the Inn.

For more information or to RSVP, call Shannon at 526-0130.

Aug 29, 2013

Gala in the Garden set for Sept. 6

GREENVILLE – The Brethren Retirement Community will host its seventh annual Charity Auction and Dinner on Sept. 6 at Romer’s, 118 E. Main St., Greenville. The Gala in the Garden, presented by Integrity Ambulance Service, features a silent and live auction and dinner.

The silent auction preview begins at 6 p.m. with dinner starting at 7:15 p.m. The live auction will follow dinner. Garden party inspired or casual attire is encouraged.

Tickets are $40. For more information, call 547-7655. The VIP Sponsor for this event is Second National Bank.

Joint replacement class set for 9/23

VERSAILLES – Dr. Chad Weber, rehab medical director for Versailles Health Care Center, along with Facility Rehab Director, Shannon Condon, held their monthly joint replacement class at Versailles Health Care Center on August 26. Dr. Weber spoke about planning for joint replacement surgery. He emphasized the importance of pre-planning your care before and after surgery.

Congratulations to Ron Mescher of Versailles. He was the winner of the door prize giveaway, good for a free entrée, compliments of Michael Anthony’s at the Inn.

The joint replacement class is a free monthly event open to anyone considering joint replacement and their families. It is offered the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m., at The Rehab Clinic at Versailles Health Care Center. Each class is taught by Dr. Chad Weber and Therapist Shannon Condon. To RSVP for the next class on Sept. 23, call Shannon, 526-0130. For more information, contact Shannon or visit www.versailleshealthcare.com.

Dr. Chad Weber congratulates Ron Mescher for winning the door prize giveaway.

VHCC at Darke Co. Fair

Sue Leugers, winner of
Dayton Dragons themed bucket.
VERSAILLES – Versailles Health Care Center recently participated in the 2013 Great Darke County Fair. Hundreds of fairgoers stopped by VHCC’s booth and played “Spin to Win” for a chance to spin the wheel and win a variety of VHCC novelty items, including tote bags, flyswatters, heart-shaped memo clips, and seven-day pill cases! The theme for this year’s VHCC booth was “PRE-pare for Your Success” and featured the Pre-Planning Rehab Options at The Rehab Clinic at Versailles Health Care Center for scheduled surgery.

VHCC also raffled off a Dayton Dragons themed bucket, including four game day tickets, peanuts and Cracker Jacks. Congratulations to winner, Sue Leugers, of Versailles.

If you are interested in learning more about Versailles Health Care Center, call 526-5570, or visit www.versailleshealthcare.com.

Busy Bee Story Time

NEW MADISON – New Madison Public Library will debut a new reading program for families with children on Sept. 16, 6:30 p.m. Busy Bee Story time will bring families together once a week for 45 minutes of library fun. Each week’s program will focus on books, music, games, and activities for young children from ages 3-5, but parents are encouraged to bring the whole family, including older children, to the program. Because children are more likely to become lifelong readers and library users if they see their parents and older siblings participating in literacy activities, Busy Bee Story time provides additional time for family browsing and checkout. Each Monday from 6:30 to 7:30 is set aside for this important family programming. This program is free and open to the public. Call the New Madison Public Library at 996-1741 with any questions.

Authors share info on their family

NEW MADISON – New Madison Public Library is pleased to announce local authors and sisters, Betty (Lease) Brodrick and Marilyn (Lease) Fritz, will be sharing from their new book, Wakefield and the Leis-Lease Family: Early Settlers on Sept. 11, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Brodrick and Fritz, members of the Darke County Genealogy Society, have been compiling family research for over two decades, and this is their second historical publication about their family history and the early settlements of Greenville, Ohio.

The authors will be sharing from their text and research while signing copies of their publications, including the previously published Recipes and Memories. Copies of these titles will be available for purchase, as well as note cards and bookmarks. Additionally, Brodrick and Fritz, avid supporters of the restoration of the Wakefield #6 School project, will be donating $1 from the sale of each book to this worthy cause. Call the New Madison Public Library at 996-1741 with any questions and plan to attend.

Rolling 50’s Cruise-In

GREENVILLE – The Legendary Rolling 50’s Classics Fall Cruise-In will be held Sept. 7, beginning at 2 p.m. and continuing until 9 p.m., in downtown Greenville on Broadway. This is one of Ohio’s largest cruise-ins. Dash plaques will be given to the first 450 cars entering. The cruise-in entry fee is $10.

There will be a live DJ playing 50s and 60s music. Proceeds benefit local and national charities including the Shriner’s Children Hospital and the Cancer Association of Darke County.

For more information, contact Dave Niley, 548-4517, or Kenny Erwin, 337-6701.

Aug 28, 2013

“No Name” rabbits take honors

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Two young ladies were holding and petting their rabbits in the rabbit barn on Aug. 17.

“It got a first, but doesn’t have a name,” said Natasha Draper.

“It?”

“She. I have 20 rabbits. I’d forget their names,” Natasha said.

Natasha’s cousin, Leah Hiestand, was petting her rabbit.

“It doesn’t have a name,” she said. It had placed second in the competition.

“It?”

“She. I have three rabbits that look just like her,” Leah explained.

Natasha, however, relented. She decided to name her rabbit Leah. “After my cousin, Leah,” she said.

Leah didn’t seem to mind.

Leah Hiestand, left, and Natasha Draper show off their “no name” winning rabbits. (Bob Robinson photo)

Honest Abe marches with Vets

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – “I’m supposed to march with the troops… but there aren’t any troops.”

Honest Abe made a dignified appearance from the grandstand as he approached Mike Morman and Urban Arling.

“One of them is supposed to adopt me,” he added.

Arling pointed off to the right side of the track where the troops were lining up. The President thanked them courteously and started off toward his troops. All of them “adopted” him.

Morman, Past State Commander of the Ohio American Legion, was the guest speaker at the Veteran’s Parade & Memorial Service Aug. 21 at the Great Darke County Fair. Arling, commander of the Darke County Chapter of the American Legion, was the coordinator of the annual event.

With military precision, the parade started at exactly 5:30 p.m. as various posts and auxiliaries marched in formation for hundreds of families, friends and guests. The National Anthem was presented by Mandy Rismiller.

“Thank you to veterans everywhere, but especially here in Darke County,” said Morman. He admonished them, however… “Service to your country cannot – can never – be done.

“Veteran’s organizations here need you to be supportive.”

He told them this didn’t just mean joining an organization. It goes beyond that.

“We have our heroes returning home. We need to encourage them. They haven’t been to college? Tell them to go to college. It’s free. They earned it as part of the federal GI Bill…

“Do you know someone struggling? Make sure they get the benefits they’ve earned.”

Morman noted Gov. John Kasich has changed the property tax exemption. It used to have an income limit of $10,000 to qualify. It is now $36,000 a year.

Morman closed by repeating veterans need to be supportive of each other, then quoted a Bible passage which said, in part, “honor to whom honor is due.”

“Today we honor Darke County veterans.”

Darke County Fair Manager Daryl Riffle thanked the veterans, noting because of those standing in front of us, we can enjoy our freedoms.

“Thanks to them, we live in the greatest country on this earth.”

Those “no longer with us” were honored with a 21-gun salute. Taps were played by Cristy Moody and Angie Rauh.

President Abraham Lincoln stood with his troops throughout the event and left the service with them. He was treated courteously but received fair warning about his status…

“Mr. President, we welcome you but I have to warn you. If you start politicking, we have a live round in one of those rifles.”

Abe was unabashed. “Oh, I thought you were going to say you’d be on the lookout for any actors.”

True to form, the President had an unlimited supply of stories for anyone who would listen.

“Did you know I was hired by the Manny Company when Manny was sued by McCormick Reaper? Paid me $1,000. $500 in advance. I did my research, came to Ohio and presented my findings to Edwin Stanton, Manny’s Ohio attorney.

“Manny tore it up, threw it in the trash and told me I wasn’t needed.”

So who won?

“McCormick.”

Manny sent me the remaining $500 but Honest Abe returned it to him, saying “I did nothing.” Manny sent it back, telling Mr. Lincoln he hired him for $1,000; he’s paying him $1,000.

“I cashed the check,” Lincoln said.

Lincoln went on to say early in his administration Stanton was his strongest critic. He was the one who termed the phrase “gorilla in the White House.”

In 1862 Lincoln made Stanton his Secretary of War. They worked together. When Lincoln was assassinated, Stanton was quoted as saying…

“Now he belongs to the ages.”

Military veterans march in formation as the parade enters and leaves the Veteran’s Parade & Memorial at the Great Darke County Fair Aug. 21

President Abraham Lincoln spins his tales before the ceremony begins.

Guest speaker Mike Morman

President Lincoln honored to march with Darke County veterans.

Hard work pays off with Third Place ribbon

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – “She placed third out of 12,” exclaimed an excited mom, Paula Walls. Her daughter, Brooke Buckingham, was “all smiles” and giving her grandpa a ride.

Brooke, 14, is a student at Greenville Junior High School. She and her registered miniature horse, Fizzie, were scheduled for two “Classes” in the Junior Fair Horse Show at the south end of the Darke County Fairgrounds on Aug. 20. Walls worked with her daughter and the horse to prepare them for each class. The first was “Ground Driving.” Brooke finished eighth of 11.

Ground driving involves walking behind the horse and directing him based upon instructions from the judge. The second was Regular Driving, which involved hitching the horse to a cart then directing him while sitting in the cart. She had never done this before. She placed third.

Brooke didn’t seem too excited about it before hand.

“He’s acting up,” Brooke told her mom. “What’s he doing?” “He rears up.” “Then snap him. He’ll stop.”

Walls said he will likely calm down, adding they hadn’t really hitched him up until about a month ago.

“I wanted to grow him a bit,” she added.

As Brooke was heading into the practice ring prior to the Ground Driving event, Walls said “The judge is going to call for a walk, then a trot. Then the judge will reverse the class to go the other way.

“She’s looking for how well the horse behaves with the driver, how well they move. She is also judging the kids on horsemanship.”

This was Brooke’s first event of the day, but her third event overall. In Showmanship she placed fifth out of 12 and in another trial – there were lots of obstacles – she also placed fifth. Eighth out of 11 in the third event was disheartening, especially since Fizzie had won the event the year before when he was only a year old.

“Fizzie was a Christmas present for Brooke,” Walls said. He was six months old when Brooke got him.

Preparing a horse for show takes a lot of work, according to Walls. Six hours or more every week is needed to care for the horse, plus an hour or two the night before an event. On show day at least two hours is needed to get the horse ready, as well as the equipment.

“He gets a bath and peppi spray to make the coat shine. We black his feet and put baby oil around his eyes and nose to make them look good…

“We all have our little show routines,” she said, grinning. Walls noted everything needs cleaning up; the harness, cart… everything.

Brooke’s sister, Justine, was also helping prepare Fizzie for his showtime events. When mom said these girls put a lot of work into this, Justine popped up, “Brooke did all the work; I’m not showing this year.”

Walls agreed that she was a proud mom, proud of both of her daughters.

“Justine would rather do registered breed horses,” mom said. “Brooke seems to work these shows well.”

When Fizzie was acting up prior to the final event, Walls gave her encouragement and advice, then noted “I’m not scratching you… not after getting everything harnessed up.”

“Sometimes Brooke seems like she’s ready to call it a day; she just needs a confidence booster.”

She placed Third in that event. Good confidence booster.

Brooke Buckingham takes advice from her mother, Paula Walls, as she prepares her miniature horse Fizzie for the final Class Show of the day.

Arcanum Library goes live with COOL

ARCANUM – Arcanum Public Library went live Aug. 15 with Evergreen on the Consortium of Ohio Libraries (COOL) shared catalog.

Arcanum is the ninth library to migrate into the system joining Community Library (Sunbury), Germantown Public Library, Selover Public Library, Mt. Gilead Public Library, Cardington-Lincoln Public Library, Worth Memorial Public Library (Versailles), Blanchester Public Library and Wornstaff Memorial Public Library. New members to the consortium, J. R. Clarke Public Library and Marvin Memorial Library are scheduled to migrate late 2013 and early 2014.

Arcanum’s library patrons will have access to a much larger collection of library materials and the convenience to pick up and return materials at both the Arcanum and Versailles locations. They may use their library cards at either library as well.

Evergreen is the open source ILS originally developed by PINES (Public Information Network for Electronic Services) for the Georgia Public Library Service. It is used by over 1,000 libraries in 31 states, four countries and eight Canadian provinces. This count only includes reported installations as anyone is free to download, install and try it out for their library.

If you have any questions about Evergreen or joining COOL, please feel free to contact consortium president Chauncey Montgomery, Director of Community Library in Sunbury (montgoc1@oplin.org or (740) 965-3910) or Marilyn Walden, Director of Arcanum Public Library (waldenm1@oplin.org or 692-8484).

In celebration of students returning to school the library will offer a Back-to-School drawing beginning Aug. 26 through Aug. 31. Winners will be announced Sept. 3 as the library will be closed for Labor Day.

DCP—through the years

GREENVILLE - This is the fifth installment of a series featuring Darke County Park District’s twelve park areas. The mission of the Darke County Parks is to acquire and preserve land areas possessing special natural and historical features and to manage and maintain these resources for the benefit of its residents through appropriate educational and passive recreational programs and activities. The Park District was created in 1972 when the honorable Judge Williams ordered the formation of the Park District. The Park District is now comprised of over 1,000 acres.

Worth Family Nature Preserve is located on Springhill Road. Worth is 35 acres of mosaic floodplain, hardwood forest, pine plantation, managed prairie and thickets that opened in 1998. There are 1.2 miles of trails through these varied habitats that will lead you to the eastern border of the park where you will find a stretch of scenic Greenville Creek. This is a unique portion of the creek in that it remains in its natural state, having never been dredged or channelized. A gift to the Park District from the heirs of Robert Worth, the meandering stream and the diverse flora and fauna make Worth Family Nature Preserve an exceptional area to visit any time of the year.

All of the Darke County Parks are open sunrise to sunset. For more information on Worth Family Nature Preserve or any Darke County Parks, call the Park Office at 548-0165 or visit our website at www.darkecountyparks.org.

A view of Worth Creek

CenturyLink donates to Bear’s Mill

GREENVILLE - CenturyLink has made a donation to historic Bear’s Mill. “The Friends of Bear’s Mill are grateful for the continued support of CenturyLink,” said Ray Lepore, board President for the nonprofit organization that operates the National Register property. “CenturyLink has donated to Bear’s Mill for the past four years and we are pleased to have their support,” concluded Lepore.

“The mission of The Friends of Bear’s Mill is to provide a rich cultural experience and community-oriented events including educational tours, demonstrations and nature walks, while preserving the Mill’s historical significance and natural beauty,” said Merri Niekamp, Outreach Manager at the Mill. “To do this, the Friends keep the doors open to the public through donations, such as CenturyLink’s, as well as grants, our educational tour program, profits from the Mill Store and Gallery and by annually planning several special events to generate interest in and visitation to the historic site,” concluded Niekamp.

Bear’s Mill is located at 6450 Arcanum-Bear’s Mill Road about 5 miles east of Greenville. For more information on special events and projects or on how to donate to The Friends of Bear’s Mill, Inc. call 548-5112 or visit www.bearsmill.com.

Left to Right – Julie Clark, Gordon Smith, Tom Menke, Ray Lepore (Friends), Rick Krogman, Susan Fowble (CenturyLink), Carlos Menendez, Merri Niekamp (Friends)

Aug 27, 2013

Showing, working with livestock a learning process

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – “We give Dorothy blueberry flavored pellets,” said Rachael Schmitmeyer. Dorothy was one of the heifers to be judged in the Junior Fair Dairy Show Aug. 19. “She doesn’t like the regular pellets we use to supplement her feed, so we give her blueberry flavored ones.”

Dorothy, however, wasn’t one of the heifers Rachael was showing.

In a family with six kids, Rachael and two of her brothers were showing seven animals; six heifers and a steer. Rachael had three of the heifers. “I’m showing Dollie, Leabelle and Belle,” she said.

A few minutes earlier her youngest brother, Jacob, had said “You want to see my heifer?”

“Sure.”

He led the way to the other side of the Dairy Barn and pointed out Dorothy. He was pleased to show his family’s animals, although he was actually unable to show one himself.

“Next year he can,” his sister Rachel said. “You have to be 10.”

The Greenville High School senior explained they pick out their animals in June and begin working with them to get them “tame.” She clarified… “Get them used to being around us all the time. Then a week before the fair we clip them.”

Once at the fair, they work about two and a half hours a day… grooming, washing and clipping. On Monday (Aug. 19) the Dairy Show started at 9 a.m.

By noon, Rachael had shown two of her three heifers in the Grade A competition. The first heifer placed sixth. The second, Leabelle, had just completed judging and finished seventh. The third was still to come that afternoon.

Rachael acknowledged being a little disappointed but noted “it’s how the judge looks at it.”

She also allowed she could have been better prepared.

“I could have worked a little more,” she said. “It’s been pretty busy this summer.”

Regardless of the ribbon, she said she learns something every time she shows and she’s been doing it since the age of nine.

She felt much of it had to do with the owner’s showmanship qualities… “It’s how you handle your calf.”

Rachael plans to go to a technical school for nutrition. “Kind of like a dietitian,” she said. She didn’t plan on going into farming herself although she hoped to be able to marry a farmer some day.

“I would enjoy still living on a farm.”

Rachael Schmitmeyer and her brother Jacob show off one of their heifers as they prepared for several Junior Fair Dairy events at the Darke County Fair. Rachael and two brothers showed six heifers and one steer. (Bob Robinson photo)

Integrity Ambulance helps at fund raiser

GREENVILLE - Integrity Ambulance Service teamed up with the Light Foundation to serve as a sponsor for The Gauntlet held August 3 at Chenoweth Trails in Greenville. The Gauntlet is a 5K Adventure race that includes natural and manmade military inspired obstacles. Integrity Ambulance Service was on site to help assist with injuries or any medical needs from the event.

Left to right: Austin Gomes, Eric Garland, Christy Garland, Kelly Merritt, Tasha Anderson, Jodi Reed, Lance Reed.

Light Foundation enables Red Cross to continue mission

DARKE COUNTY - Known for football, the Patriots and now the Light Foundation, Matt Light continues to support the Darke County community through his foundation, generously giving to the American Red Cross Darke County Chapter over $1300 dollars.

The partnership between the Light Foundation and the American Red Cross were created through a volunteer partnership for the foundation’s fundraiser, “The Gauntlet”. There the Red Cross volunteers brought in the Chapter’s Emergency Response Vehicle to serve post-race nutrition, volunteers manned changing tents and volunteers, certified in CPR and First-Aid, were placed throughout the race course, aiding runners and ensuring runner safety. The Darke County Red Cross participated in the Green Sneakers shoe drive, and with the aid of many participating businesses, such as MidMark and Neff, elementary schools and area churches, over 790 pounds of shoes were collected and turned in for rebate.

“It was an excellent opportunity for our volunteers to work with volunteers from other agencies”, stated, Lynne Gump, Executive Director, American Red Cross, “Any time we can work in collaboration for the community’s greater good is a win for all involved.”

For information volunteering with the American Red Cross, call the Darke County Chapter of the American Red Cross at 548-1002 or visit www.redcross.org/oh/greenville.

Rapid Re-housing Rental Assistance is available

GREENVILLE - Community Action Partnership has Rapid Re-housing Rental Assistance available for individuals or families who are literally homeless (residing in Emergency or Transitional Shelters) or who are living in a place not meant for human habitation. This temporary assistance is to help obtain housing. Rapid Re-housing Assistance may provide rental assistance and/or security deposit. Please call 548-8143 for an appointment or for additional information.

State of the Heart receives unusual gift

GREENVILLE - State of the Heart Hospice recently received an unusual gift from the family of a patient who was cared for by the agency: Over 100 Boyd collectable bears in varying costumes and outfits for special holidays and occasions were given to the agency by the patient’s husband, Herb Stocker of Greenville.

Mary Jane (Janie) Stocker was cared for by State of the Heart Hospice weeks before she passed away this summer. For many years, she and her sisters had collected Boyd Bears. Following her death, her husband heard about State of the Heart’s annual camp for grieving children called Camp BEARable. He thought the bears could be used in grief support for children, so donated them to the nonprofit agency.

“She would be so happy to know that her bears are going to a cause that can help kids,” said Stocker, of Greenville. Several large bags containing the bears were brought to the agency. According to Ryan Gathard, Fund Development Director for State of the Heart, the bears will be used by staff when working with kids’ grief groups. State of the Heart provides free grief support to both adults and to children.

Stocker said his wife began collecting the bears many years ago. Their house, he said, “was filled with them.” His wife passed away in their home with the bears displayed on shelves surrounding her bed, he said.

He was grateful to State of the Heart for the care they provided his wife, he said. “I don’t know how I could have gotten through it all without them.” He was especially thankful he said when he needed assistance with his wife at 3 a.m. one night. “I called State of the Heart and they came right away to help me,” he said.

State of the Heart Hospice, with offices in Greenville, Coldwater and Portland, provides care to patients and families in eastern Indiana and western Ohio who are confronting a life limiting illness. For more information about the agency, visit the web site at www.stateoftheheartcare.org.

Herb Stocker is pictured with some of the Boyd bears he donated to State of the Heart.

Ladies Night Out for Cancer Association

GREENVILLE - “All About You Therapeutic Massage” will be holding a Ladies Night Out fundraiser at Romers Catering in Greenville for the Cancer Association of Darke County. The event will be held on Nov. 2 from 4 to 9 p.m.

According to Cancer Association Executive Director Christine Yount, the event was a great success last year and they hope for your help to make it more successful this year.

Pre-sale tickets are $45 each or two for $80. Tickets at the door will be $50 each. Ticket includes a catered meal, entertainment by comedian Leslie Norris Townsend, shopping with over 25 local vendors, a DJ, door prizes and free services such as mini-manicures, chair massage, facials, satin hands treatments and more. Townsend has appeared on Jay Leno, Arts & Entertainment Network (A&E) and more.

Tickets will be available beginning mid-September. Call 202-4104 or find the association on facebook. Credit cards are accepted.

The Cancer Association appreciates the wonderful community support for cancer patients in Darke County. They partner with United Way and are not affiliated with the American Cancer Society. Anyone living in Darke County with a diagnosis of cancer may receive benefits from the organization.

For questions, call the office and speak with Christine, Executive Director, at 548-9960.

Aug 26, 2013

Summers pleads guilty to Felony 3 sexual battery

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Christopher A. Summers, 33, pleaded guilty Aug. 26 to one count of Felony 3 sexual battery in Darke County Common Pleas Court. This is following a guilty plea to eight counts of Felony 3 sexual battery in Mercer County.

According to Darke County Prosecutor R. Kelly Ormsby, Summers had originally pleaded innocent but had changed to a guilty plea partway through his trial in Mercer County, then changed his plea here.

Summers is due to be sentenced in Celina on Sept. 17. He will be sentenced in Darke County on Sept. 18.

Summers faces up to 40 years in prison from his Mercer County guilty plea, a five year maximum for each count.

“On the assumption there will be a prison term given in Mercer County,” Ormsby said, “we plan to recommend a term to be served concurrently with the similar accounts there.”

All charges relate to a single victim, a Ft. Recovery high school student who was 17 at the time. Summers was her teacher and coach. One of the criminal acts between Summers and the victim took place in Darke County.

“As a Tier III sexual offender, he will have to register with the local sheriff every three months for the rest of his life,” Ormsby said.

American Red Cross offers tips to help kids stay safe home alone

DARKE COUNTY – As children around the nation are returning to school, many of them will be spending time home alone after school until their parents get home from work or school. The American Red Cross has steps parents and children can take to make these after-school hours safer and less stressful.

“Decide if your child is mature enough to be home alone and ask him or her if they would be comfortable being alone.” “Parents and guardians should develop a home safety plan and discuss it and practice it with their children. After-school child care, programs at schools and youth clubs, or youth sports programs are alternatives for children who are not mature enough or uncomfortable staying home alone,” added Lynne Gump.

The Red Cross recommends that parents and guardians take the following steps if a child will be home alone after school.

If the child is going to go home after school, it’s a good idea to have them call to check in when they get home. For an older child, set ground rules about whether other kids can come over when the parents are absent, whether cooking is an option, and whether they can leave the home.

Other steps that parents and guardians can include in their home safety plans:

Post an emergency phone list where the children can see it. Include 9-1-1, the parents work and cell numbers, numbers for neighbors, and the numbers for anyone else who is close and trusted.

Identify neighbors whose home the child can go to in case of an emergency that requires the child to leave the home.

Practice an emergency plan with the child so they know what to do in case of fire, injury, or other emergencies. Write the plan down and make sure the child knows where it is.

Make sure the first aid kit is stocked and stored where the children can find it; keep it out of reach of young children.

Let children know where the flashlights are kept. Make sure that the batteries are fresh, and that the child knows how to use them.

Remove or safely store in locked areas dangerous items like guns, ammunition, knives, hand tools, power tools, razor blades, scissors, and other objects that can cause injury.

Make sure potential poisons like detergents, polishes, pesticides, car-care fluids, lighter fluid and lamp oils are stored in locked cabinets or out of the reach of children.

Make sure medicine is kept in a locked storage place or out of the reach of children.

Install safety covers on all unused electrical outlets.

Limit any cooking a young child can do. Make sure at least one approved smoke alarm is installed and operating on each level of the home.

Limit the time the child spends in front of the television or computer. Activate parental controls. Use programs that limit the sites children can visit, restrict chat sites and allow parents to monitor online activity.

Safety steps children should know, when talking to kids about being at home alone, parents should stress each step, and post them somewhere to remind the child about what they should, or shouldn’t, do until mom, dad or caregiver get home:

Lock the door and make sure all the windows are closed and locked.

If the home has an electronic security system, children should learn how to turn it on and have it on when home alone.

Never open the door to strangers. Always check before opening the door to anyone, looking out through a peephole or window first. Only open the door for people that parents and guardians have given you permission to let in the house. If unsure, contact your caregiver.

Never open the door to delivery people or service representatives. Ask delivery people to leave the package at the door or tell them to come back at another time. Service representatives, such as a TV cable installer, should have an appointment when an adult is home.

Never tell a person on the telephone the parents are not at home. The child should say something similar to, “He or she is busy right now. Can I take a message?”

Do not talk about being home alone on public websites. Kids should be cautious about sharing information about their location when using chat rooms or posting on social networks.

Never leave the house without permission. If it’s okay to go outside, children should contact their parents and tell them where they are going, when they are leaving, and when they will return. If mom and dad are still at work, children should call them when they leave and when they return home.

Do not go outside to check out an unusual noise. If the noise worries the child, they should call their parents, an adult, or the police.

Don’t talk to strangers.

Do not have friends over to visit when parents aren’t home. Do not let anyone inside who is using drugs or alcohol, even if the child knows them.

If the child smells smoke or hears a fire or smoke alarm, they should get outside and ask a neighbor to call the fire department.

Many tweens and teens are responsible for watching younger siblings. The Red Cross Babysitter’s Training course provides 11 to 15 year-olds with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely and responsibly provide care for children and infants. Participants learn basic child care and first aid, develop leadership skills and learn how to develop a babysitting business. Additionally, an abbreviated, on-line version is also available, for information, contact the Darke County Red Cross at 548-1002 or visit website at www.redcross.org/oh/greenville.

American Red Cross offers tips to help kids stay safe home alone

DARKE COUNTY – As children around the nation are returning to school, many of them will be spending time home alone after school until their parents get home from work or school. The American Red Cross has steps parents and children can take to make these after-school hours safer and less stressful.

“Decide if your child is mature enough to be home alone and ask him or her if they would be comfortable being alone.” “Parents and guardians should develop a home safety plan and discuss it and practice it with their children. After-school child care, programs at schools and youth clubs, or youth sports programs are alternatives for children who are not mature enough or uncomfortable staying home alone,” added Lynne Gump.

The Red Cross recommends that parents and guardians take the following steps if a child will be home alone after school.

If the child is going to go home after school, it’s a good idea to have them call to check in when they get home. For an older child, set ground rules about whether other kids can come over when the parents are absent, whether cooking is an option, and whether they can leave the home.

Other steps that parents and guardians can include in their home safety plans:

Post an emergency phone list where the children can see it. Include 9-1-1, the parents work and cell numbers, numbers for neighbors, and the numbers for anyone else who is close and trusted.

Identify neighbors whose home the child can go to in case of an emergency that requires the child to leave the home.

Practice an emergency plan with the child so they know what to do in case of fire, injury, or other emergencies. Write the plan down and make sure the child knows where it is.

Make sure the first aid kit is stocked and stored where the children can find it; keep it out of reach of young children.

Let children know where the flashlights are kept. Make sure that the batteries are fresh, and that the child knows how to use them.

Remove or safely store in locked areas dangerous items like guns, ammunition, knives, hand tools, power tools, razor blades, scissors, and other objects that can cause injury.

Make sure potential poisons like detergents, polishes, pesticides, car-care fluids, lighter fluid and lamp oils are stored in locked cabinets or out of the reach of children.

Make sure medicine is kept in a locked storage place or out of the reach of children.

Install safety covers on all unused electrical outlets.

Limit any cooking a young child can do. Make sure at least one approved smoke alarm is installed and operating on each level of the home.

Limit the time the child spends in front of the television or computer. Activate parental controls. Use programs that limit the sites children can visit, restrict chat sites and allow parents to monitor online activity.

Safety steps children should know, when talking to kids about being at home alone, parents should stress each step, and post them somewhere to remind the child about what they should, or shouldn’t, do until mom, dad or caregiver get home:

Lock the door and make sure all the windows are closed and locked.

If the home has an electronic security system, children should learn how to turn it on and have it on when home alone.

Never open the door to strangers. Always check before opening the door to anyone, looking out through a peephole or window first. Only open the door for people that parents and guardians have given you permission to let in the house. If unsure, contact your caregiver.

Never open the door to delivery people or service representatives. Ask delivery people to leave the package at the door or tell them to come back at another time. Service representatives, such as a TV cable installer, should have an appointment when an adult is home.

Never tell a person on the telephone the parents are not at home. The child should say something similar to, “He or she is busy right now. Can I take a message?”

Do not talk about being home alone on public websites. Kids should be cautious about sharing information about their location when using chat rooms or posting on social networks.

Never leave the house without permission. If it’s okay to go outside, children should contact their parents and tell them where they are going, when they are leaving, and when they will return. If mom and dad are still at work, children should call them when they leave and when they return home.

Do not go outside to check out an unusual noise. If the noise worries the child, they should call their parents, an adult, or the police.

Don’t talk to strangers.

Do not have friends over to visit when parents aren’t home. Do not let anyone inside who is using drugs or alcohol, even if the child knows them.

If the child smells smoke or hears a fire or smoke alarm, they should get outside and ask a neighbor to call the fire department.

Many tweens and teens are responsible for watching younger siblings. The Red Cross Babysitter’s Training course provides 11 to 15 year-olds with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely and responsibly provide care for children and infants. Participants learn basic child care and first aid, develop leadership skills and learn how to develop a babysitting business. Additionally, an abbreviated, on-line version is also available, for information, contact the Darke County Red Cross at 548-1002 or visit website at www.redcross.org/oh/greenville.

Unique Annie Oakley collectible

GREENVILLE - The Garst Museum and The Annie Oakley Center Foundation, in Greenville, Ohio is pleased to offer a unique Annie Oakley Collectible that previously has not been offered for sale. This card is reminiscent of promotional cards Annie Oakley would hand out to her audience after a sharp shooting performance. Today, the originals are in museums and private collections and are highly sought after as Annie Oakley collectibles.

In memory of Annie, the Annie Oakley Center Foundation asked Annie’s great, great, grandnephew, marksman Jeff Perry, to shoot through the heart of these newly produced cards. 100% of the money from the sale of these cards will benefit the Foundation and the Garst Museum.

The Annie Oakley Collectible card (first in a series) can be purchased from the Garst Museum Store for $5 each. To order, visit the Garst Museum or call the museum at 548-5250.

The Garst Museum and The National Annie Oakley Center are located at: 205 N. Broadway, Greenville, OH 45331, web site: www.garstmuseum.org, email: information@garstmuseum.org, Phone: 548-5250

For more information about Annie Oakley and the Foundation, www.annieoakleycenterfoundation.org.

A legend retires

BY BILL STEVENS
SENIOR SCRIBE
If you have ever been to the county fairs, especially the Great Darke County Fair, you have seen him doing what he loves to do best: bringing smiles to thousands of children. He does this by taking balloons and turning them into poodles, swords, crowns and a variety of other delightful objects.

You can’t miss him! His bright red hair is covered by a funny hat that has a flower growing out of it. His shoes are three different colors and the ties he wears are totally outlandish! He has a big red nose and a constant smile.

He is the one and only “Hot Shot Z Clown”!

Now, after 41 years of bringing smiles to children (and adults), Hot Shot Z Clown has decided to retire.

“It’s time,” he said. “I’ve been doing this for a long, long time and even clowns get tired. I would like to spend more time with my friends and family.”

While fairgoers only interact with him for a few minutes, they fail to realize that Hot Shot Z Clown, who likes to keep his real name anonymous, has had a very storied and amazing career. For instance, did you know that Hot Shot is a graduate of the Ringling Brothers & Barnum & Bailey Clown College and has appeared on the Bozo the Clown television show? In addition, he has been the opening act for some great entertainers!

“My greatest memory,” he said, “was when I was the opening act for Red Skelton at one of his performances. He was a good man and it was my honor to know him.”

(Mr. Skelton was a very famous comedian who had a very popular television show in the sixties. Mr. Skelton died in the late 1990s.)

While Hot Shot Z Clown is ‘retiring’ from the business, he is making one giant exception.

“I love the people of Darke County and I love the Great Darke County Fair,” he said with a smile. “I may be retiring from the other fairs and events, but I will be back here next year and the year after that and every year after as long as I can and as long as long as they will have me!”

Those are the happiest words the people of Darke County have heard in a long, long time!

We wish Hot Shot Z Clown the best retirement possible and we certainly are proud to say he will come out of retirement at least once every year, around the end of August!

After retirement Hot Shot Z Clown will keep the Great Darke County Fair on his schedule.

Poker run for Mike Roth

GREENVILLE- The friends and family of Louis “Burnie” Wimbley Jr. will be sponsoring a poker run on Sept. 14, rain or shine to donate money for fellow rider Mike Roth for mounting medical expenses. Registration will being at 11 a.m. with the first bike out at 1 p.m. at Hot Rods & Harleys of Greenville. Participants will return to Hot Rods & Harleys at 6 p.m. with drawing and prizes awarded. All motorcyclists are welcomed. For those who don’t ride but would still like to donate come join us at Hot Rods & Harleys at 6 p.m. for festivities. The cost will be $15 to ride and $20 if you are a rider with a passenger. Prizes will include best poker hand, 50/50 Drawing, raffle & door prizes, along with other bike games with cash prizes. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Free commerative can coolie to those who participate. Participating businesses will be Hot Rods & Harleys of Greenville, Elks of Union City, Buffalo Wild Wings of Troy, Whistle Stop of Ansonia, and Cruizers of Russia, and BG’s of North Star. For more information contact Ben Hoying at 417-9464 or Annette Hoying at 417-9465.

Auditions to be held for fall play

PIQUA - The Edison Stagelight Players are holding open auditions for Jane Austin’s “Pride and Prejudice” on September 3 and September 4 from 7—9 p.m. in the theater on Edison’s Piqua Campus. Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script. The show will be performed on the evenings of October 25-26 and November 1-3. Two additional morning performances will be scheduled for high school students. For information contact Emily Beisner at ebeisner1981@edisonohio.edu.

Reid Hospital Sponsors SUNshine 5K

GREENVILLE - Reid Hospital has partnered with the HOPE Foundation of Darke County to serve as major sponsor of the SUNshine 5K Run/Walk on September 28 at Greenville City Park. Proceeds from the event will support scholarships to Darke County students and community grants to local non-profit organizations. Reid Hospital and Greenville Orthopedics & Sports Medicine (a Reid Physician Associates practice) are proud to be a part of this exciting wellness event that will attract hundreds of runners and walkers. Participants will enjoy a quality 5K race with electronic chip timing, great door prizes, and a variety of post-race drinks, snacks and homemade cookies.

Headquartered in Richmond, Indiana, Reid has several offices in Greenville, including Bethel Cardiology and Greenville Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. A new Reid satellite facility on Katzenbarger Road is set to begin construction this year.

To register for the SUNshine 5K on Sept. 28, visit the HOPE Foundation website at www.hopedarkecounty.com. Entry fee is $15 (with tech t-shirt) by Sept. 16 and $20 (t-shirt not guaranteed) after Sept. 16. Kids 800-meter fun run is $3 or $8 (with cotton t-shirt). The SUNshine 5K is part of the Wayne Healthcare Challenge “Get Moving” Series.

As the community foundation of Darke County, the HOPE Foundation receives, administers and distributes charitable gifts for the benefit of Darke County residents. For more information, call 548-HOPE or visit www.hopedarkecounty.com.

Reid Hospital has partnered with the HOPE Foundation of Darke County to serve as major sponsor of the SUNshine 5K Run/Walk on September 28 at Greenville City Park. Dr. Carl Wooldridge (right) of Greenville Orthopedics & Sports Medicine presents a check to Christy Prakel, president of the HOPE Foundation of Darke County.

Aug 25, 2013

Greenville freshman takes top individual honors


BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Taylor Ward, an incoming freshman at Greenville High School this year, took top honors at the 23rd Annual Great Darke County Fair Cheerleading Competition on Aug. 16.

“I’m happy and excited,” she said, all smiles as she was holding her trophy.

Taylor started working on her routine in June. She did the standard cheer and chant but made up some of the dance portions.

“I practiced every day at home,” she said. “I started gymnastics and tumbling when I was six or seven.”

Her coach, Carol Paul, added her mom used to cheer. “She makes sure Taylor works out daily.”

“You called it right,” Paul noted. There were several excellent performances in the individual competition; this one seemed to stand out a little more, something extra about it. “She’s going to be a special kid,” Paul added.

Taylor will be cheering both football and basketball on Junior Varsity, as well as running track in the spring.

Students were happy to talk about their performances… once they caught their breath. In all cases it took a few minutes.

Arcanum senior Aubrey Kreusch had been working on her routine for about a month. She spent considerable time working with her team before she realized it was time to begin working on her own performance.

“We made up our routine this year,” she said, adding “my girls come first. Then I thought, uh oh, I’d better get working on my own.”

Aubrey cheers football, basketball and competition. She also does dance and tumbling at the “Y.”

Shania Baker, a Franklin Monroe sophomore, had been working on her routine throughout the summer, starting as soon as school was out.

“I’ve been working with the junior high team whenever they practiced,” she said. The last couple of weeks have been pretty much every day.

“I’ve been doing this since I was five,” she said, but was “doing it on my own until junior high.”

She cheers for basketball and competition, and plays volleyball.

Taylor took the trophy out of a field of 11 competitors. Kelly Moore of Bradford earned the second place ribbon.

In addition to Kelly, Aubrey and Shania, also competing were Peyton Kreitzers, Samantha Ewing, Bri Garber, Serena Stastny, Kelly Fourman, Cydney Adams and Hope Jankowski.

Taylor talks with her cheerleading coach Carol Paul. (Bob Robinson photo)

Grandstand filled to capacity for country concert

BY RYAN BERRY
MANAGING EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Approximately 6,000 concert goers had the opportunity to hear where country music is going and where it came from at the Great Darke County Fair. Up and coming country artist Florida Georgia Line kicked off the show and had the Grandstand rocking with their brand of country music. Although the group is still considered a newcomer on the music scene, having released their first CD in 2012, fans were singing along with Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard on every song. The songs that received the most reaction from the Darke County audience were Round Here, Get Your Shine On and the award winning #1 song, Cruise.

Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry headlined the sold out show and brought the house down with their legendary voices. Fans, old and new, were jumping up and down and pumping their fists in the air from the first note played by the Montgomery Gentry Band to the last note of the encore.

When asked if it was the new-found popularity of Florida Georgia Line or the legendary status and a string of hits from Montgomery Gentry that contributed to the sell-out, Darke County Fair Board members couldn’t answer. The most common answer was, “We were lucky.” Fortunately for Darke County Fair goers, that has been a common answer over the past few years. The board has boasted sell-outs or near sell-outs with Lady Antebellum, REO Speedwagon, Styx, and Foreigner.

The board will begin searching for next year’s entertainment this fall and should announce its decision in late winter or early spring.

Montgomery Gentry sang one hit song after another as they played to a packed house for over an hour and a half. (Ryan Berry photo)

Gail Overholser holds the guitar autographed by Montgomery Gentry she won in the contest sponsored by The Early Bird. She is shown with Ben and Josh Overholser. Her winning bid of $1,275 was given to State of the Heart Hospice. (Ryan Berry photo)

Fitzgerald is oldest person at the fair

BY RYAN BERRY
MANAGING EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Elaine Fitzgerald may be 103-years old, but she wasn’t going to let that stop her from going to the Great Darke County Fair. As the day approached and her family asked her what she wanted to do Fitzgerald said, “I’m going to the fair.”

Fitzgerald was born on July 2, 1910 and moved to Darke County in the 1930’s. In the 80+ years she has lived in the county, the Darke County Fair has been a part of her family’s life. She has four children and would bring them to the fair and always let them ride the merry go round.

As the oldest person at the fair, Fitzgerald was given $100 in prize money. The award was sponsored by Gregory Peck Sound Service and the Darke County Agricultural Society. This was her first time to receive the award.

Elaine Fitzgerald receives her $100 prize from Gregory Peck, Jennifer Peck, Velma Campbell and Daryl Riffle. (Ryan Berry photo)

Arcanum, Ansonia take home top team trophies

BY BOB ROBINSON
ASSOC. EDITOR
GREENVILLE – Arcanum’s varsity squad took home the Large Varsity Cheer trophy at the Great Darke County Fair 23rd Annual Cheerleading Competition Aug. 16. Ansonia’s Junior High squad took home the Junior High Cheer trophy, while Mississinawa Valley took home the Large Varsity Dance trophy.

“This was really tough,” said the judges for the event. Carrie Brown, Haley Roach and Morgan Landy, all University of Dayton Cheerleaders, said they had to confer a few times before making their decisions. Two of the judges are from Indiana, the other from northern Ohio.

“There were a lot of quality teams; we were under a lot of pressure to choose the best of the performances.”

The competition fielded eight events, from Pee Wee Dance to the varsity cheer. Darke County teams took home the majority of the honors.

Large Varsity Cheer winners: Arcanum, Greenville second and Ansonia third. Junior High Cheer: Ansonia followed by Tri-Village and Arcanum. Large Varsity Dance: Mississinawa Valley followed by Bradford, with a tie for third between Franklin Monroe and Covington. Junior High Dance: Mississinawa Valley followed by National Trail.

Individual competition winners: Leah Wilburn followed by Lexi Shinn, both of Ansonia, Junior High competition; and Taylor Ward, Greenville, followed by Kelly Moore, Bradford, in the high school individual competition.

In the Pee Wee competitions, Tri-Village Youth Reserve took first in Pee Wee Dance, followed National Trail. Pee Wee Cheer winners were: Tri-Village Youth Varsity, followed by Greenville Youth and National Trail Youth Cheer.

Mississinawa Valley won the Spirit Award.

Contestants are judged in the following categories: Choreography: Creativity, Difficulty and Formations & Transitions; Group Execution: Synchronization & Timing and Spacing; Technique: Body Placement & Control, Strength in Movement and Technique; and Overall Effect: Eye Contact and Showmanship, and Crowd Appeal.

Ansonia junior high cheerleaders take home the First Place trophy for the Junior High Cheer at the Darke County Fair Cheerleading Competition. (Bob Robinson photo)

Arcanum varsity cheerleaders take home the First Place trophy for the Large Varsity Cheer at the Darke County Fair Cheerleading Competition. (Bob Robinson photo)

 
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